Richard Grant’s article Why scientists are losing the fight to communicate science to the public makes two good points about why people are often suspicious of scientists. I shall add a third, which to me is the important one.

Grant is pro-science. The population, he tells us, is not on the whole scientifically literate, and scientists want us to give us and our children a better life. It’s for our own good that they tell us their stuff.

When I told the taxi driver that I was a priest, there was a pause. Then he said ‘Oh. I believe in evolution.’ ‘So do I’, I replied. That was too much for him. ‘I can’t take that.’

The study of evolution, like many academic disciplines, produces real insights and there is no good reason for Christians to reject it. However the case for it is undermined when its enthusiasts claim more for it than they should.

We were all the victims of the Paris attacks in January. We are Charlie Hebdo and all who were murdered at the Bataclan in November.

Now, we are all those who were the victims of violent racism, from Texas, USA to Birmingham UK. Except that, for the most part, we are none of these people. To identify with someone is not to become that person. Becoming the other person begins with knowing who we are.

Last Saturday’s Pride march in Liverpool was a great occasion, according to the reports I’ve received.

I’ve been sent some photos depicting protestors with banners displaying biblical texts. They give the impression that the Bible disapproves of what Pride stands for.

Of course, they can take for granted that nobody in the march is going to get a bible out and check the references.

Except that I did.

I re-started being a Christian at the age of thirty, after over ten years of having limited interest in Christianity.

In my late twenties, I started attending 12 Step recovery meetings patterned after Alcoholics Anonymous. I had struggled with an eating disorder and mental health issues since childhood, and sought all kinds of professional help.