Liturgical seasons are seldom in tune with the emotions of the immediate moment - perhaps Ascencion Day this week was an exception.

Ascension day is, we are told, a time when the disciples who were left behind after Christ’s ascent into heaven went down the mountain rejoicing. It seems paradoxical, to say the least.

This post is part of a series summarising some of the arguments in my new book Why Progressives Need God.

I was in Manchester today, and took the photo below of the ‘Islam Against Extremism’ preacher.

This post is part of a series summarising some of the arguments in my new book Why Progressives Need God.

This post is about how we identify ourselves and who we exclude.

When Peter McGeary reviewed this book for the Church Times, he wondered that the writer thought she had written a book which was just about preaching.

He was right. It is more than about preaching. Or perhaps it would be more truthful to say that I wrote this book from a sense that either all Christians are called to be preachers, or that being a preacher, or being any kind of Christian, requires that we become more fully ourselves, the persons we really are.

This post is part of a series summarising some of the arguments in my new book Why Progressives Need God.

Everybody needs somewhere to live. Nobody wants to be a refugee, travelling from country to country looking for somewhere to settle down.