by F. Gerald Downing
from Modern Believing Vol 58:1 - January 2017

Abstract:

Contemporary discussions of (re)conciliation are found among commentaries on St Paul, systematic theologians and secular thinkers. A comparison of their treatments shows that, in contrast with most of the theologians, certain of the secular thinkers are the closest to St Paul, though without overt reference to him.

Keywords:

ATONEMENT, CONCILIATION, LANGUAGE, POLITICS, RECONCILIATION, SECULAR, SENSITIVITY


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by Clive Marsh & Vaughan S. Roberts
from Modern Believing Vol 58:1 - January 2017

Abstract:

Popular music is an ever-present element in Western culture and exhibits some significant religion-like qualities. Increasingly these are being studied by theologians and scholars of religion. This article reviews some of that recent academic research, focussing on the role played in popular music by lyrics, ritual and practice, and its critique of religion. Then we proceed to look at the wider implications of the growing place of spirituality in our society and how that relates to religion and pop music, before concluding by examining some of the ways in which the practice of listening to popular music shares common ground with forms of religious practice.

Keywords:

BODY, CULTURE, FANDOM, POPULAR MUSIC, PRACTICE, RELIGION, RITUAL, SPIRITUALITY


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by Hugh Rock
from Modern Believing Vol 58:1 - January 2017

Abstract:

This article analyses the three liberal principles in the religion of George Fox; the priority of deed over doctrine, the priority of the light in relation to scripture, and an incipient Humanism. It is proposed that his Christianity is an underused resource for theological liberalism.

Keywords:

GEORGE FOX, QUAKERISM, LIBERAL THEOLOGY, CALVIN


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by Simon Taylor
from Modern Believing Vol 58:1 - January 2017

Abstract:

This positive biblical argument for same-sex marriage begins by noticing that it is unlikely Christianity should be interested in marriage at all. That interest comes from the eschatological account in Isaiah and Revelation of the relationship of God and creation as one of marriage. This eschatological approach enables a deeper reading of the household code in Ephesians and its account of marriage. The paper then turns to an account of Gentile inclusion as a model of how the Church might accept gay and lesbian people. It challenges Andrew Goddard’s use of Acts 15 to reinforce the prohibition of same sex relationships, by drawing attention to the way in which the Council of Jerusalem uses scripture. The paper challenges the way in which the enforced celibacy imposed on gay clergy undermines the liberating origins of Christian celibacy. It argues that Genesis 2 is badly misused to support compulsory heterosexuality. The paper then identifies a number of gifts that same-sex marriage brings to straight marriage, not least an undermining of patriarchal structures. Finally, the paper turns to the First Letter of John and warns that in failing to recognise love in same-sex relationships, the Church is in danger of failing to recognise God.

Keywords:

BIBLE, CELIBACY, CHURCH OF ENGLAND, CREATION, ESCHATOLOGY, GENTILE INCLUSION, MARRIAGE, THEOLOGY


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by Keith Ward
from Modern Believing Vol 58:1 - January 2017

Abstract:

Professor Schmidt-Leukel has claimed that there are only four possible views about truth in religion. Either no religions are true, or only one religion is true (exclusivism), or many are true, and either one is superior (inclusivism) or all are about equally true (pluralism). I argue that the ideas of equal or superior truth are unclear, and that there are many other possible views. I propose a twofold contrast – between closed (rigid, crucially important and totally authoritative) and open (flexible, varying in importance and restrictedly authoritative); and between exclusive (only one path leads to salvation) and inclusive (many paths lead towards salvation).

Keywords:

AUTHORITY, CLOSED VIEWS, EXCLUSIVISM, INCLUSIVISM, OPEN VIEWS, PLURALISM, RELIGION, SALVATION, TRUTH


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