This post is part of the series introduced here, summarising some of the arguments in my new book Why Progressives Need God.

Here I argue that we need change because of what Christians believe about God.

This post is part of the series introduced here, summarising some of the arguments in my new book Why Progressives Need God.

The series presupposes that people who call themselves Christians ought at least to think Christ was broadly right in what he taught and believed. This post draws on up to date research about Jesus and how his views compare with the values of governments today.

This is the first of a series of blog posts in preparation for the British General Election on 8th June 2017. I shall be arguing on theological grounds that Christians should work together for a major change of direction in government priorities. At the very least this means getting rid of the current government, but it means much more besides.

Like all my blog posts, this is a personal statement by me. I shall be criticising the direction of travel especially over the last seven years, more generally over the last forty, and in some cases over a much longer period.

In The Guardian last week, there was an article lampooning Theresa May’s visit to Bridgend. In it, we read that ‘Supreme Leader Kim Jong-May’ received a ‘rapturous’ welcome. Perhaps this tells us something about Bridgend. Or is it that British public life now merits such headlines, in order to grab our attention, sated, as we are, with personality politics?

I am not a fan of Theresa May, or of her party, but I am not comfortable with her name being so closely associated with that of a baby-faced psychopath intent on global destruction. If a respected newspaper does this, it somehow implicates all of its readers so, as a regular reader of the Guardian, I am made uncomfortable by the idea that I am guilty by association if I find the suggestion at all funny.

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This is the talk I gave at St Bride's Liverpool last night, in the ‘What’s so special about religion?’ series. The title was ‘What’s so special about Christianity?’

My aim is to draw out how Christianity has meant different things at different times, by giving a brief summary of its history. I am not claiming any deep truth for my nine stages. You could divide up Christian history in any number of ways. This is just my way of summarising what seem to me the most distinctive types.