by David Taylor,
from Signs of the Times No. 14 - Jul 2004
[Reply to The pleasures of Hell by Jonathan Clatworthy, Jan 2004]

Mr Clatworthy has drawn us an intriguing picture of hell, but there is one point on which I feel he has misled us.

"Like much of classic Christianity, the doctrine of hell is widely attributed to the Bible, but in fact dates from a later era." I don't think we can really criticize those who insist on a Biblical basis for the doctrine of hell; though on the other hand, the better sort of Christian - readers of Signs of the Times? - will be reassured to learn that it can probably be detached from the teaching of Jesus himself.

by Kevin Kelly
from Signs of the Times No. 14 - Jul 2004

I was not only unmoved by the film, but I actually felt it was very unhelpful in terms of helping me encounter Christ.

All the emphasis was on the violent suffering inflicted upon Christ and on the terrible inhumanity of those who beat and scourged him. It almost gave the impression that what was 'divine' about Jesus was his ability to absorb a superhuman amount of pain and suffering.

by David L Edwards
from Signs of the Times  No. 14 - Jul 2004

We can readily understand why the Anglican Communion can be expected by some to split up in the very near future.

Any hope that the Eames Commission will find a formula which will preserve or restore bonds of unity virtually intact is slender. The disagreements between Anglicans are now more profound than those which are accepted in the World Lutheran Federation, for example. Both sides in this dispute knew precisely what they were doing when they caused an explosion where unity had always been unstable.