by Matt Gardner
from Signs of the Times No. 33 - Apr 2009

2009 sees the 120th anniversary of the founding of the Student Christian Movement, one of the very first ecumenical organisations and a pioneer over more than a century of open-minded, critically engaged Christianity.

The influence of SCM has spread beyond the student world as throughout the 20th Century people who had their spiritual, political and social formation in the movement took those values forward into careers in the church, the ecumenical movement and wider society (not to mention the MCU!). The NUS, LGCM and to an extent the WCC can all claim parentage of the Student Christian Movement.

by Peter Foley
from Signs of the Times No. 33 - Apr 2009

I'm currently researching the first proper schism in the Anglican Communion that took place starting at the end of the seventeenth century and lasting to the end of the eighteenth century. It is salutary to compare that schism with the current standoff between North American Anglicans and the Common Cause Partnership.

The Common Cause groups are quite a diverse collection: some ordain women, some do not for example. Anglicanism has always prided itself in getting people with different theologies together under an umbrella, so that should be fine. The only problem is that the members of the Common Cause Partnership all branched off from Anglicanism for one reason or another, so their staying power may be limited.

by Marilyn McCord Adams
from Signs of the Times No. 33 - Apr 2009

When I ran for election as General Synod representative for Oxford University, I promised to support a single clause measure for the ordination of women to the episcopacy.

The proposals produced by the legislative drafting committee and presented at the February Synod meeting were a far cry from a single clause measure. Unlike many who reckoned that something is better than nothing and that infiltration is the best policy, I voted against sending the drafts forward for revision.

by Jonathan Clatworthy
from Signs of the Times No. 33 - Apr 2009

We live at a time of two competing crises.

One is the environment: extinction of species, soil erosion, pollution and, most pressing of all, global warming all threaten the future of humanity. We urgently need to reduce many activities, especially the ones emitting carbon dioxide.

The other is the recession. Credit has collapsed, debt abounds, we need 'to get the economy growing again' and increase our activities.

Editorial by Anthony Woollard
from Signs of the Times No. 33 - Apr 2009

'There is probably no God.'
'There definitely is a God.'.
'Oh no there isn't.'
'Oh yes there is!' 

The sides of London buses are beginning to look like pantomime scripts. Whoever said that religious debate - and religion itself - was dead?