by Jonathan Clatworthy
from Signs of the Times No. 38 - Jul 2010

At their New Year Festival the ancient Babylonians recited the Enuma Elish, their account of how the world was created.

After some wars between the gods one of them, Marduk, gained supremacy. To consolidate his position he did something to please the other gods. Until then they had all done their own cooking and housekeeping; but Marduk created the world, put humans on it, and gave us the job of maintaining temples and burning sacrifices. We are a labour-saving device for the gods!

by Jeyan Anketell
from Signs of the Times No. 38 - Jul 2010

Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, Christians and other believers all find meaning in their belief systems and their devotions; they are spiritually and devotionally attached to them.

The doctrine of the Trinity is probably the biggest article of belief separating most Christians from their Jewish and Muslim neighbours (who also believe in one God who created and sustains the Universe); particularly the idea of the divinity of Jesus. The doctrine of the Trinity is also the one belief held in common by most but not all people who call themselves Christians.

by Jonathan Clatworthy
from Signs of the Times No. 38 - Jul 2010

The second half of 2010 is proving a significant time for the Church of England's governing body, General Synod.

The first of three significant events may have already happened by the time you read this. Early in July, Synod votes on women bishops. There is a consensus that we should allow them, but much debate over the small print. Will women bishops have the same rights and responsibilities as their male counterparts, or will they be hedged about with conditions?

Editorial by Anthony Woollard
from Signs of the Times No. 38 - Jul 2010

Rowan Williams is a very embattled man.

Jonathan Clatworthy's first article in this edition refers to the way he is handling the so-called crisis created by the US Episcopal Church's consecration of a partnered lesbian bishop (more details on our website). We may - and do - disagree with the way that he seems to have been co-opted to an illiberal cause. But he sits astride a fault-line in the Anglican Communion, and few of us would wish to be in his shoes.