More... Modern Church is 120!    

Modern Church is 120!

Modern Church is celebrating 120 years with a social media campaign recording key moments in its history

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More... Modern Church, Greenbelt & Pussy Riot    

Modern Church, Greenbelt & Pussy Riot

Modern Church General Secretary Jonathan Draper reflects on our partnership with this year's festival and sponsorship of three acts

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More... Our annual conference - A student's perspective    

Our annual conference - A student's perspective

Trainee Methodist Pioneer Minister Dave Shaw thanks delegates who donated to enable student volunteers to attend this year

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Books reviewed January 2008

In Modern Believing Jan 2008 • previous editionnext edition

MedicinePerson

Medicine of the Person: Faith, Science and Values in Health Care Provision

John Cox, Alistair V. Campbell and Bill (K. W. M.) Fulford (eds.)

London and Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. Pp. 240.

Details / buy from Amazon UK

Reviewed by Robert Thompson, Kensington and Chelsea Primary Care Trust


20cRCtheologians

Twentieth-century Catholic Theologians

Fergus Kerr

Oxford: Blackwell, 2007. Pp. ix, 230.

Details / buy from Amazon UK

Reviewed by Thomas O'Loughlin, University of Wales, Lampeter


7SacramentsMysteries

The Seven Sacraments: Entering the Mysteries of God

Stratford Caldecott

New York: Crossroad Publishing Company, 2006. Pp. x, 148.

Details / buy from Amazon UK

Reviewed by Patrick Thomas, Carmarthen


Modern Believing editorial January 2008

by Paul Badham
from Modern Believing Vol 49:1

A more permissive attitude

From the time when King Alfred placed the Ten Commandments at the head of his laws there has been a strong level of agreement between what Christian opinion of the time approves and what the law of the land allows or forbids. In the 1960s the Church of England played  an absolutely key role in persuading Parliament and public opinion to adopt a more permissive attitude on many issues. Through the reports of its Board for Social Responsibility and through the speeches of its bishops, the Church of England led the way in the debates leading to the decriminalisation of homosexuality, abortion and suicide, in the abolition of capital punishment and in liberalising laws relating to marriage and divorce and to censorship.  In all these cases the Church supported the move to a more humane and less judgemental society. It is a tragedy that the same cannot be said of the role of the Christian churches today.

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Books reviewed October 2007

In Modern Believing Oct 2007 • next edition

scholarship fierce sincerity

Scholarship and Fierce Sincerity: Henry D. A. Major, The Face of Anglican Modernism

Clive Pearson, Allan Davidson and Peter Lineham

Auckland: Polygraphia, 2006. Pp. 245.

Details / buy from publisher

Reviewed by Paul Badham, University of Wales, Lampeter

Henry Dewsbury Alves Major (1871-1961) was the leading figure  in the Modern Churchpeople's Union from joining in 1911 until his death in 1961 and central to Modernist Anglican theology through this period.
Signs of the Times article - review by Michael Cocks

XtyAttitude

Christianity with Attitude

Giles Fraser

Norwich: The Canterbury Press, 2007. Pp. 176.

Details / buy from Amazon UK

Reviewed by Robert Thompson, Kensington and Chelsea Primary Care Trust


ClericalCelibacyHeritage

Clerical Celibacy: The Heritage

William E. Phipps

London: Continuum, 2006. Pp. x, 272.

Details / buy from Amazon UK

Reviewed by Thomas O'Loughlin, University of Wales, Lampeter


Modern Believing editorial October 2007

by Paul Badham
from Modern Believing Vol 48:4

Ministerial challenges

A key priority for the Church today should be to make proper use of its ministerial resources. Three of the articles in this edition document its failure to do so, particularly in relation to the ministry of women and the ministry of those working outside traditional structures. David Voas’ article highlights the fact that the Church of England is rapidly becoming dependent on its women priests. Almost half of the newly ordained in the past five years are women and because the age structure of serving clergy is skewed to men in their fifties or sixties who will retire in the next decade, women will provide close to half the clerical labour force in the relatively near future. The Church cannot do without its women priests, yet the evidence suggests that they get a very poor deal at present. Few women are given posts of real responsibility. More than half will minister to Sunday congregations of fewer than 50 and no woman has been given responsibility for a thriving congregation of 300 or more. Most women are not even paid for their labour since 54 per cent are now ordained into non-stipendiary posts whereas two-thirds of men go into a paid ministry.

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