More... Annual Conference 2019    

Annual Conference 2019

Theology in the public square - Monday 15th to Wednesday 17th July 2019 at High Leigh Conference Centre, Hoddesdon, Herts.

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More... Modern Church is 120!    

Modern Church is 120!

Modern Church is celebrating 120 years with a social media campaign recording key moments in its history

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More... Modern Church, Greenbelt & Pussy Riot    

Modern Church, Greenbelt & Pussy Riot

Modern Church General Secretary Jonathan Draper reflects on our partnership with this year's festival and sponsorship of three acts

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More... Our annual conference - A student's perspective    

Our annual conference - A student's perspective

Trainee Methodist Pioneer Minister Dave Shaw thanks delegates who donated to enable student volunteers to attend this year

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More... Reclaiming evangelism: Positive liberal theologies of mission    

Reclaiming evangelism: Positive liberal theologies of mission

Modern Church sponsored day conference Saturday 2nd February 2019 9.30am-4pm, Liverpool.

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More... New head of contemporary spirituality    

New head of contemporary spirituality

NEW Managing Editor of Modern Church's quarterly liberal theology journal Modern Believing announced as Coordinator of Centre for Contemporary Spirituality…

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Review - Love let go: Radical generosity for the real world by Truax & Campbell

by Paul Brett
from Signs of the Times No. 68 - Jan 2018

I approached this book with suspicion. Eerdmans is an Evangelical publisher, and the story is about something happening in America.

The title itself suggested a feast of emotion, not to say sentimentalism. The foreword confirmed my fears:

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Review - Listening & spiritual conversation by Sue Pickering

by David Greenwood
from Signs of the Times No. 68 - Jan 2018

This book achieves its objective of being, on the one hand, a self-help guide to gaining a sense of spiritual well-being and, on the other, a guide to Christian ministers wishing to improve their communication skills.

The guide is written from the Christian perspective and is very firmly embedded in the Biblical tradition, with an anthropomorphic approach assumed. The author is an Anglican priest working in New Zealand, involved in the training of spiritual directors and, as a Canon of Taranaki Cathedral, she leads workshops on spirituality and ageing.  For those involved with parish life and mission action planning, this book could make a huge contribution.

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Review - Light when it comes by Chris Anderson

by Rebekah Hanson
from Signs of the Times No. 68 - Jan 2018

The author is a US English professor and Catholic deacon, and he uses both of these aspects of his life to create a poetic reflection on his spiritual life.

The book is inspired by his practice of the Examen, a daily Ignatian spiritual prayer exercise. At the beginning and end of the book he gives brief summaries of what the Examen entails, its origin and influence on the book. His reflections may, therefore, be more fruitful for those who are already familiar with Ignatian spirituality. Nevertheless, it is a thought-provoking and moving read for those who seek spiritual insight from everyday life experiences.

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Review - The making of humanity: poetic vision and kindness by Dinah Livingstone

by David Williams
from Signs of the Times No. 68 - Jan 2018

The latest book by the poet and author Dinah Livingstone offers an engaging yet provocative study of the relationship between poetry and theology as sister arts, based on the premise that poetic vision and kindness are the making of humanity.

It also has a recurrent theme that poetry offers a shining (or revelation) of meaning which derives from its form.

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Review - The political Samaritan: How power hijacked a parable by Nick Spencer

by Jonathan Clatworthy
from Signs of the Times No. 68 - Jan 2018

Even though Nick Spencer is the Research Director of Theos, I thought this was a rather lightweight book - until I got to the final chapter, which came as an unexpected surprise.

It is certainly easy to read. The first chapter gives a chatty overview of how politicians treat religion, leading to reflections on how we use language. We do get introduced to the language theories of Augustine and Wittgenstein, but gently.

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